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A good mentor is someone who does not know everything

From October, 100 alums from Aarhus BSS will take part in this year’s mentor programme ‘Aarhus BSS Mentor100’. We have asked one alum, Helle Glyø, why she is a mentor. She is an independent coach and change consultant and holds a BSc in Economics and Business Administration ('87) and a Graduate Diploma in Business Administration (HD) ('91).

2016.09.26 | Dennis Arnsbæk

Helle Glyø, BSc in Economics and Business Administration ('87) and a Graduate Diploma in Business Administration (HD) ('91)

From October, 100 alums from Aarhus BSS will take part in this year’s mentor programme ‘Aarhus BSS Mentor100’. Over the next nine months, they will guide, support and challenge our students on study and career related questions. We have asked one alum, Helle Glyø, why she is a mentor. She is an independent coach and change consultant and holds a BSc in Economics and Business Administration ('87) and a Graduate Diploma in Business Administration (HD) ('91).

 

Why are you a mentor?

To give something back. It’s a responsibility that I choose to accept. I have knowledge of the labour market which is valuable to the students. And because I’m not a lecturer, employer or supplier, none of us have anything at stake. I’m not grading anyone or paying the students a salary for their efforts. The mentor programme represents a free mental space where I have the opportunity to reflect on my own career and pass on knowledge. That the programme can also develop into a friendship while strengthening my professional skills and my network is an added bonus.

 

How can you use your role as mentor in your own career?

I get an unfiltered look at the choices that my mentee has to make and the concerns behind them. This teaches me something about people. In addition, a part of the mentor programme consists of training sessions and academic presentations, where I acquire specific tools.

 

How do you work as a mentor?

I’m conscious of not being a mentor who knows all the answers. I don’t believe I have to pave the way for my mentees and tell them what to do in relation to their career or their studies. My mentee shouldn’t be a reflection of myself. I think it’s more important to listen than to talk.

 

What is your best experience as a mentor?

A mentee often has a real concern about an exam, or about how he or she will find a job or an internship. When I get a text message or an email saying ‘It went well - thanks for your help’, I’m happy. Right down to the bone. It may seem trivial, but when you feel your mentee has made a choice, pushed their limits and overcome a challenge, it rubs off.

 

How do you find the time for the programme?

I expect my mentee to have a clear plan when we meet. What are we going to talk about? What does he or she hope to gain from it? Otherwise you quickly lose track of time. I also think my mentee benefits from knowing that I have a busy schedule, and knows that it’s important that I use my time wisely. Conversely, my computer and my phone are always off when we meet. 

 

Helle Glyø is an independent coach and change consultant as well as an alum from Aarhus BSS - see her profile here. She was elected mentor of the year in 2015 and participates for the fourth time this year. If you want to know more about the role as mentor and Aarhus BSS Mentor100, you can read more here.

Alumni